In China, Food Shortages, Corruption In Government, And High Rates Of Opium Addiction Led To (2023)

1. China Was Insulated From The Scientific And Industrial Revolutions

  • Jun 4, 2023 · Answer: imperialism. Question: In China, food shortages, corruption in government, and high rates of opium addiction led to. the Opium Wars.

  • Question: A rising sense of nationalism in China was a reaction to the inability of Cixi to accept foreign ideas. the strong foreign influence in China. the apathy of the Chinese people. the declining economy. Answer: the strong foreign influence in China. Question: The group of Chinese peasan

2. In China, food shortages, corruption in government, and high ... - Weegy

  • In China, food shortages, corruption in government, and high rates of opium addiction led to the Opium Wars. the Taiping Rebellion. the Boxer Rebellion. the ...

  • In China, food shortages, corruption in government, and high rates of opium addiction led to the Opium Wars. the Taiping Rebellion. the Boxer Rebellion. the Open Door Policy.

3. In China, food shortages, corruption in government, and high rates of ...

  • In China, food shortages, corruption in government, and high rates of opium addiction led to the Taiping Rebellion. Expert answered|Wallet.ro|Points 143152|.

  • In China, food shortages, corruption in government, and high rates of opium addiction led to

4. China Increasingly Relies on Imported Food. That's a Problem.

  • Missing: corruption opium addiction

  • China has so far been able to feed its 1.4 billion people, but climate change and a dependence on imports could pose challenges.

China Increasingly Relies on Imported Food. That's a Problem.

5. [PDF] The Qing and the First Opium War

  • The First Opium War marks a pivotal point in China's history. It begins the “Century of Humiliation” which spans the time roughly one.

6. Qing China's Internal Crisis: Land Shortage, Famine, Rural Poverty

  • Heavy taxes, inflation, and greedy local officials further worsened the farmer's situation. Meanwhile, the government neglected public works and the military, ...

  • Introduction

7. [PDF] 30903 - World Bank Documents

  • It argues that the opium economy—including its nexus with insecurity, warlords, state weakness, and poor governance— constitutes a central development problem ...

8. [PDF] A Century of International Drug Control - UNODC

  • Very high levels of opium use were also found in the various ... Government of China in their efforts to eradicate the production and consumption of Opium ...

9. Illicit crop cultivation - UNODC

  • ... food shortages and the unpredictability of agricultural markets, economic ... opium poppy leaves farmers in the hands of unscrupulous middlemen. In some ...

  • Illicit crop cultivation

10. In China, Food Shortages, Corruption In Government, And ... - Scouting Web

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FAQs

In China, Food Shortages, Corruption In Government, And High Rates Of Opium Addiction Led To? ›

World History Exam 2 Notes  In China, food shortages, corruption in government, and high rates of opium addiction led to the Taiping Rebellion.

What were the causes of the Taiping Rebellion? ›

The causes of the Taiping Rebellion were symptomatic of larger problems existent within China, problems such as lack of strong, central control over a large territory and poor economic prospects for a massive population.

Which is the correct order of events that eventually led to the collapse of the Chinese imperial government? ›

Which is the correct order of events that eventually led to the collapse of the Chinese imperial government? Opium Wars, Taiping Rebellion, Boxer Rebellion, rise of nationalism. What was the significance of the Treaty of Nanjing in 1842? Europeans forced the Chinese to sign it, ending the first Opium War.

What steps did Chinese emperors take to reduce foreign influence in? ›

Chinese emperors pursued a policy of "isolationism," or sealing off the empire to reduce foreign influences that they thought were negative. They had no interest in European manufactured goods. They limited trade to just one port along the along the coast.

What product did britain continue to export despite objections by the Chinese government silk fabric opium coal art? ›

What they found was opium. So Britain exported opium, which is a highly addictive drug, to China who wanted it.

What were two effects of the Taiping Rebellion? ›

Our findings indicate that Taiping Rebellion has negative impacts on population density, but positive effect on industrialization and urbanization through change in endowment, human capital, and official stricture. These findings also shed light on the origin of industrialization and urbanization in Modern China.

What were the major effects of the Taiping Rebellion? ›

The Taiping Rebellion affected a large area of China between 1850 and 1864, cost millions of lives, and had the potential to overthrow the Qing dynasty. In 1851, Hong Xiuquan's Taiping army swept across China towards Nanjing, which fell in 1853 and became the Taiping capital.

What led to the decline of ancient China? ›

In brief,the key reason of the periodic collapse and reconstruction of ancient Chinese civilization is the population pressure in a relatively limited land resources and unfair distribution and possession of social wealth.

What caused the fall of China? ›

During World War II, popular support for the Communists increased. U.S. officials in China reported a dictatorial suppression of dissent in Nationalist-controlled areas. These undemocratic polices combined with wartime corruption made the Republic of China Government vulnerable to the Communist threat.

What led to the fall of China? ›

The 1931 Japanese invasion of Manchuria began a chain of events that led to the eventual communist overthrow of China in 1949. For years, the Nationalist government of Chiang Kai Shek had worked to suppress rebellions by the Chinese Communist Party (CCP). The government was effective in defeating communist forces.

What made the Chinese empire so successful? ›

The Chinese imperial rule thrived from 600 to 1700 C.E. Many factors led to its rise while the Western societies lay dormant. China, at that time, boasted of effective irrigation techniques, a taxable farm surplus, a vast network of trade routes, and even a specialized class of urban artisans.

How did the Chinese try to control imperialism in China? ›

In 1757, the Qing introduced the canton system, requiring foreign companies to trade with a Chinese merchant collective – not directly with the Chinese people. These attempts to limit and control foreign trade activity failed and it began to spread beyond the south-east.

What did the Chinese do to protect their empire? ›

The Great Wall of China was built over centuries by China's emperors to protect their territory. Today, it stretches for thousands of miles along China's historic northern border.

What drug did Britain force China to trade with them? ›

It is called the 'Opium War' because of one of its major causes: the British were smuggling opium from their Indian colonies into Chinese ports against the wishes of the Chinese government.

Why did China not want other countries to make silk? ›

Silk became a prized export for the Chinese. Nobles and kings of foreign lands desired silk and would pay high prices for the cloth. The emperors of China wanted to keep the process for making silk a secret. Anyone caught telling the secret or taking silkworms out of China was put to death.

Why did the Chinese government try to stop the opium trade with Britain? ›

Beyond the health problems related to opium addiction, the increasing opium trade with the Western powers meant that for the first time, China imported more goods than it exported. Settling this financial problem eventually led to the First Opium War between Great Britain and China, from 1839 to 1842.

What are the causes and effects of the Boxer Rebellion? ›

The main cause of the Boxer Rebellion was the presence of foreigners and Christianity in China. Related to this cause was the supposed ineptness of Empress Dowager Cixi and the Qing dynasty.

What were the core beliefs of the Taiping movement? ›

The core of the Taiping faith focused on the belief that Shangdi, the high God of classical China, had chosen the Taiping leader, Hong Xiuquan, to establish his Heavenly Kingdom on Earth.

What was the cause of the self strengthening movement? ›

The movement was stimulated by the military training and techniques exhibited during the Westerners' cooperation with the Qing in ending the Taiping Rebellion (1850–64) and was supported by Prince Gong in Beijing.

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